Why this is Florence’s most legendary steak house

  • T-bone steak is a delicacy in Florence, Italy.
  • We visited Trattoria Dall’Oste, a steak house in the heart of city that serves the juiciest steaks in town.
  • “To be called Florentine, a steak has to be three fingers thick. It has to stand by the bone on the grill,” Chef Michele Cardamone told INSIDER. “The average weight goes from 1.2 kilograms to 1.4 kilograms.”
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T-bone steak is among the best dishes to try when visiting Florence, Italy. The city has a strong meat culture and strict rules when it comes to how its steaks are cut, grilled, and even served. We visited Trattoria Dall’Oste, a steak house in the heart of city that serves the juiciest steaks in town to find out what makes the perfect Florentine steak.

“To be called Florentine, a steak has to be three fingers thick. It has to stand by the bone on the grill,” Chef Michele Cardamone told INSIDER. “The average weight goes from 1.2 kilograms to 1.4 kilograms. It has to be taken out of the fridge four hours earlier and kept at room temperature until it goes on the grill at 50° C (122° F).”

Trattoria dall’Oste was established in 1979 as a traditional Tuscan restaurant. Big cuts of meat have always been there, but the new ownership in 2009 decided to make steak the real queen of the restaurant. It now has four steakhouses across Florence, sourcing the best breeds of cattle from Italy and the world.

Although the name “Florentine” refers to the cut only, the traditional Florentine steak is made with a breed of Tuscan cattle called Chianina.

“Chianina is from Tuscany,” said Cardamone. “It was used as a draft animal in the ancient times, when tractors didn’t exist. Then it started to be raised for its meat, for the Florentine steak specifically. A very strong meat that, after being aged from 25 to 30 days, it becomes extremely tender. Slightly marbled, it’s a typical Italian meat.”

Trattoria Dall’Oste serves 12 different types of beef. “We have all the best Italian breeds like Chianina, Romagnola, and Marchigiana,” marketing manager Carmine Bellino told INSIDER. “We also have Spanish breeds like the famous Rubia Gallega, and we also have Japanese Wagyu, the famous Kobe.”

The restaurant serves a daily average of 300 to 350 steaks. Last year, it served a record of 100,000 steaks.

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